tips for picky eaters part 2

18 Oct

Melissa-dArabian-and-her-daughters-on-Ten-Dollar-Dinners-784x1024Welcome to our second edition of tips for picky eaters, thanks to Melissa d’Arabian’s “Picky Eaters Project.”

We hope that her advice has been helpful to our readers who have children, grandchildren, or are caretakers of children, educators, or anyone who is interested in childhood nutrition.

Here is our quick summary for this week:

Create food awareness: 

  • Foster a basic understanding of nutrition, where food comes from, and how it affects your body. Go shopping at a farmers market, or go visit a farm. Have your children chose produce, and bring it home to cook with. Review the importance of nutrients with them, and make it easy for them to remember: vitamins (make us grow), proteins (build muscle), fiber (scrubs your insides), carbohydrates (give you energy).

Food presentation: 

  • Have your children present the meal to the table, reviewing what each food item is and how it benefits your body.

Play the sugar game: 

  • Melissa’s children love sweets, so she wanted to educate them on the amount of sugar present in their favorite treats. She accomplished this by measuring out the teaspoons of sugar in those desserts, providing them with a memorable visual of the sugar content of these foods (1 tsp of sugar = 4 grams of sugar). You can do this with fat or salt, depending on what your family eats too much of, or has a sweet spot for that is not necessarily healthy.

Swap in healthier options: 

  • For dessert, try swapping out full sized brownies for one bite brownies, then serve more open quantity dishes like yogurt, and chopped fruit. That way they will get their brownie fix, while filling up on more satisfying and healthier options.

Other tips: 

  • For vegetables, instead of serving just one veggie per night, serve two and offer them a choice.  This will give them a voice at the dinner table.
  • Work on their crutch foods, like Melissa’s daughters’ passion for shredded cheese. She serves it to them in pre-portioned ramekins to control portions, and she won’t serve it two days in a row.
  • Get your kids involved in the cooking process. Have them pick a recipe or two of vegetables, and have them take the lead and make it for dinner.

We have one more post in store, so stay tuned!

Photo courtesy of askmissa.com

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