Tag Archives: digestion

the importance of chewing

12 Nov

PrintChewing your food is more important that you think!  Did you know that chewing is the first step in the process of digestion?

When we chew our food, our bodies are better able to absorb the nutrients, and digest the food we eat, providing us with the energy we need to function well through out the day. Chewing your food thoroughly also leads to a healthier digestive system.

When we chew, our bodies release enzymes in our saliva that help break down food, and convert it into energy. Chewing helps prevent our stomachs from doing all of the work of digesting the food we are eating. So the next time you are eating, try to focus on each and every bite.

Here is a helpful suggestion “chew your food completely until it is small enough and dissolved enough to be swallowed with ease. A good rule of thumb is as follows: if you can tell what kind of food you are eating from the texture of the food in your mouth (not the taste), then you haven’t chewed it enough. For example, if you are chewing broccoli and you run your tongue over the stalk and can tell that it is still a stalk or over the floret and you can still tell that it is still a floret, don’t swallow. You need to keep on chewing until you can’t tell the stalk from the floret.”

For more information on how to improve your digestive health, check out this link that discusses how digestion is the cornerstone of wellness and longevity.

Happy chewing to all!

Photo courtesy of eatingmindfully.com

soothing ginger tea

19 Oct

7178625061_796d8d7f0fAs the temperature changes, look to ginger tea for some warming comfort, and calm.

Ginger is famous for its various beneficial properties which include relieving nausea, dizziness, mucus, flu symptoms, menstrual cramps, migraines, and even helps cure athletes foot when used as a foot soak. Ginger helps calm stress, uplifts mood, and stimulates digestion. What could be better?

Here is an easy way to incorporate ginger into your day. Boil up a quick and soothing ginger tea! All you need is ginger + water, and to make it even more delicious, add a squeeze of lemon and a touch of honey.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2-1 inch of ginger root, sliced thinly (you can keep the skin on)
  • 2-3 cups of water (depending on how strong you like it)
  • honey, as much you like
  • lemon, as much as you like

Directions:

Place sliced ginger into a pot, add water then bring to a boil. Let gently boil for 5-10 minutes. Add honey and lemon, then pour tea into your mugs. You can re-boil the ginger slices for 2-3 more batches of tea.

Photo courtesy of RobotSkirts

How to pull together an elaborate salad in a flash

25 Apr
Hungry for something refreshing that will leaving you feeling energized? Try our salad recipe!
For a time saving tip, we suggest chopping up the cilantro in advance and placing it in a container in your fridge so that you can use it on all sorts of meals. Cilantro helps cleanse our body, and aids us in digestion. This lovely herb also freshens our breath and helps promote a healthy liver, and tastes fantastic in most meals!
We also suggest buying pumpkin seeds in your bulk section, and either storing them in a glass container in your fridge, or toasting them right away, as they can easily go bad if left out. Pumpkin seeds are high in zinc, which helps strengthen our cells, hair, skin and eyesight. They are a versatile seed, that tastes great in granola, trail mix, pesto, topped on fish, mixed with rice or ground up in a mortar and pestle.
Ingredients:
  • Beets, grated
  • Carrots, grated
  • Pumpkin seeds, toasted
  • Olives, chopped
  • Cilantro, chopped
  • Salad greens
Directions:
Toast your pumpkin seeds over medium heat in a pan on your stove top. Make sure to toss them frequently so they get evenly cooked. Once fragrant, lightly browned and puffed up, remove them from your pan and place in a bowl to cool down (you will hear some fun crackling noises!). Place your salad greens in a big bowl (if using heads of lettuce, rinse, dry and chop them up). Rinse your beets and carrots, then grate them over your greens. Cut up your olives. Pluck off your cilantro leaves from the stems, and chop them up as well (or use our time saving tip).
Mix together with a simple honey-mustard vinaigrette (makes 1/2 cup):
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, or canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Processed vs. Unprocessed foods: a look into your intestines

28 Feb

Ever wondered what your intestines look like when you are digesting food?

Check out this short video from a recent TEDxManhattan talk that provides a visual breakdown of the difference of how processed and unprocessed foods are digested in the body. This project was created by Stefani Bardin, honorary resident at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in New York, and teacher of Food Studies at The New School + Art, Media and Technology at Parsons, and gastroenterologist Dr. Braden Kuo of Harvard University.