Tag Archives: nutrition education

tips for picky eaters part 3

25 Oct

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We’re back with our last installment of Melissa d’Arabian’s “Picky Eaters Project.”

We’ve learned a lot along the way! For a quick recap, click here for part 1, and here for part 2.

Here is our summary for you all to enjoy:

Healthier meal makeover:

  • Bridge from kid food to adult food with gradual transitions. Start with the chicken nuggets your kids love, then create a homemade version of them. From there, go onto a  homemade chicken milanese, then onto a baked breaded fish stick.
  • Other examples include: transitioning from white bread to wheat bread, then to whole wheat bread. Same goes for pasta (regular – whole wheat), or juice (regular – to diluted with water).

Menu planning strategies:  

  • Include your kids in the menu planning process, so that you’re involving them in creating a family meal. On your night, use that as an opportunity to introduce new dishes, making sure theres at least one thing that your kids will eat.

Master breakfast and snacks:

  • Swap out the sugary stuff, and develop two or three easy breakfasts that you can rotate like mini muffins, whole grain cereal with milk, fruit, or green smoothies. For snacks try something nutritious like whole grain crackers, apples, almond butter, string cheese, or berries.

Don’t forget the fun:

  • Do something fun and physical with your kids whether it’s bike riding, walking, dancing, or playing. Make  up recipes with your kids. Cooking can then become even more of a family activity mainstay.

Take stock of where you are:

  • Review the binder that you created at the beginning of the project, and see how far you have come. Celebrate your small victories, “its about progress, not perfection.”

We hope that Melissa’s tips will continue to inspire your family meals for some time to come!

Photo courtesy of blog.landofnod.com

tips for picky eaters part 2

18 Oct

Melissa-dArabian-and-her-daughters-on-Ten-Dollar-Dinners-784x1024Welcome to our second edition of tips for picky eaters, thanks to Melissa d’Arabian’s “Picky Eaters Project.”

We hope that her advice has been helpful to our readers who have children, grandchildren, or are caretakers of children, educators, or anyone who is interested in childhood nutrition.

Here is our quick summary for this week:

Create food awareness: 

  • Foster a basic understanding of nutrition, where food comes from, and how it affects your body. Go shopping at a farmers market, or go visit a farm. Have your children chose produce, and bring it home to cook with. Review the importance of nutrients with them, and make it easy for them to remember: vitamins (make us grow), proteins (build muscle), fiber (scrubs your insides), carbohydrates (give you energy).

Food presentation: 

  • Have your children present the meal to the table, reviewing what each food item is and how it benefits your body.

Play the sugar game: 

  • Melissa’s children love sweets, so she wanted to educate them on the amount of sugar present in their favorite treats. She accomplished this by measuring out the teaspoons of sugar in those desserts, providing them with a memorable visual of the sugar content of these foods (1 tsp of sugar = 4 grams of sugar). You can do this with fat or salt, depending on what your family eats too much of, or has a sweet spot for that is not necessarily healthy.

Swap in healthier options: 

  • For dessert, try swapping out full sized brownies for one bite brownies, then serve more open quantity dishes like yogurt, and chopped fruit. That way they will get their brownie fix, while filling up on more satisfying and healthier options.

Other tips: 

  • For vegetables, instead of serving just one veggie per night, serve two and offer them a choice.  This will give them a voice at the dinner table.
  • Work on their crutch foods, like Melissa’s daughters’ passion for shredded cheese. She serves it to them in pre-portioned ramekins to control portions, and she won’t serve it two days in a row.
  • Get your kids involved in the cooking process. Have them pick a recipe or two of vegetables, and have them take the lead and make it for dinner.

We have one more post in store, so stay tuned!

Photo courtesy of askmissa.com

grilling tip + gratitude

17 Jun

5062066751_bbfb3a8ce4Calling all grilling enthusiasts!

Leave a lasting mark on your summer grilling ingredients by using the “cross hatch” method.

Not only does the cross hatch make your food look pretty, it allows it to cook more evenly ensuring that your ingredients both look and taste delicious.

Check out our last table top of the school year that our students get to read during lunch. Hopefully this cooking method will inspire our students during their fun summer cook outs!

Happy end (or almost end) of the school year for all! It’s been an amazing year filled with lots of healthy food, nutrition education, cooking classes and happy and healthy children.

Thanks to everyone that has been apart of making our program a success, and to all of our students, parents and faculty for being so supportive, informative and enthusiastic.

Looking forward to another spectacular school year ahead, and a rich, fun and eye opening summer camp program to come!

With gratitude,

The Butter Beans Team

Photo courtesy of Dinner Series

future of food in 2050

5 Nov

Last week the nation celebrated Food Day, a movement for healthy, affordable and sustainable food. The marquee for the event was a conference entitled Future of Food 2050.

Our advisor Dr. David Katz was a guest panelist at the event, speaking alongside Eric Meade, Vice President and Senior Futurist, Institute for Alternative Futures and Andrea Thomas, SVP for sustainability at Walmart.

We had the opportunity to connect with Dr. Katz prior to the event, asking him some of our questions regarding the future of food. Here are some highlights:

Butter Beans: What will the role of the lunch server be? Will there be an educational component to school cafeterias?

Dr. Katz: The only food options will be wholesome, mostly direct from nature, mostly plants. Education about food will be culture-wide, and by 2050 there won’t be much need for it in cafeterias anymore.

Butter Beans: Will nutrition education be incorporated into state and national education standards?

Dr. Katz: Yes. Food literacy will be as important and universal as any other kinds of literacy. There will be gaps, as there are with literacy, but not for want of embracing it as a priority.

Butter Beans: What will Myplate look like in 2050? What will the ratio of meat:vegetables be?

Dr. Katz: Meat will be optional/discretionary. MyPlate will no longer exist because the government will have acknowledged its conflicts of interest, and outsourced dietary guidelines to an independent organization such as IOM.

Butter Beans: How do you see the role of nutrition and food education evolving in schools and government policy?

Dr. Katz: The primary driver of dietary change will be culture change, and that in turn will change the food environment. Good choices will be easy choices, and often the only choices – reducing the burden on the educational system. But education about food choice, food important, food effects, food selection, and food preparation will be universal because these will be considered basic, modern survival skills.

Dr. Katz also noted that, “In the case of food, much depends on whether we make decisions while we still have options, or have decisions imposed on us because our options have run out. 2050 will look one way if we choose to update our culture, and quite another if we wait for demographic, economic, health and ecological calamities to make our choices for us.”

What will the state of our food system look like in 2050? Dr. Katz reflected that if our culture deemed that our health mattered as much as our wealth, you would see investments in our health increase.

Dr. Katz believes that we have to find ways to get our culture to think of health as a form of wealth, and not address health issues after they have manifested themselves, rather address them beforehand. He promotes prevention as a solution to health problems down the road, and in his vision of 2050 we are all much better off than we are now, as long as our culture collectively decides, and acts on creating a better food future for all.

Photo courtesy of trendhunter.com and usda.gov

Vote For Butter Beans!

25 Jun

For all of you wonderful blog followers out there, we have a short and sweet favor to ask of you.

We have entered a contest to obtain a $250,000 grant to help grow our company, and would love your support! In order for us to be considered for this grant, we will need 250 votes by Saturday, June 30th.

As of this morning we have a grand total of 162 votes, so our goal is indeed reachable. Feel free to spread the word to your respective blog communities, friends, family and colleagues. Thank you for your support in our vision of improving children’s lives through healthy eating and nutrition education.

To vote, visit http://bit.ly/votebutterbeans, and click on the bottom right “Log In & Support” to log in through your facebook account. Search for “Butter Beans” and click on us.

Your vote will help support Butter Beans by increasing the number of children that participate and have access to our nutritious school lunches and snacks, along with growing our nutrition & wellness programs in schools, providing scholarships for our food & garden summer camp, and so much more!