Tag Archives: soup

simply miso

25 Jan

3323901811_7c96a70cdfThere are some days where nothing beats a warm miso soup. The flavor of fermented soybeans, and the feeling of warmth soothes all woes.

Known for it’s anti-aging, intestinal support, and immune boosting properties, miso soup is a wonderful tonic for our fast paced world. When sitting down to a bowl of miso soup, you just can’t help but slow down.

Here is a simple miso soup recipe adapted from both epicurious and naturalnews.com:

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup dried wakame
  • 1/4 cup shiro miso (white fermented-soybean paste)
  • 6 cups filtered water, or you can make Dashi
  • 1/2 pound soft tofu, drained and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced scallion greens

Directions:

Thinly slice scallions, and drain/cube tofu. Combine wakame with warm water to cover it by 1 inch, and let sit for 15 minutes. Drain. Place water, scallions and wakame in a saucepan, bring to a boil. Reduce heat, add tofu cubes then simmer for 10-20 minutes until tender. Remove 1.5 cups of broth from saucepan and place in a bowl. Let broth cool a bit, then add in the miso and mix. Place the miso and water mixture back into your saucepan, let mingle, then serve right away!

Photo courtesy of Robert Banh

Easy watermelon gazpacho

15 Aug

Most watermelons are large in size, and in turn, yield high volumes of  delicious flavor, natural sugar, lycopene, vitamins C + A, and water content through the roof (~92%)!

Did you know that watermelons are extremely nutrient dense? A food that is nutrient dense is one that contains a large amount of nutrients relative to calories. In order for us to stay healthy and vibrant, it’s crucial for us to consume nutrient dense foods, drink plenty of water, and get exercise.

While fresh watermelon is amazing, and watermelon salads are fantastic too, watermelon soup is pretty spectacular too, and takes no time. Try transforming your melon into a refreshing summer gazpacho!

Makes 6 servings, recipe adapted from Eating Well

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups diced watermelon
  • 1 medium cucumber, peeled
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped shallot
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3/4 tablespoon salt

Directions: 

Mix all of your ingredients into a large bowl. Puree 3 cups at a time, transferring the pureed mixture into a separate bowl. Puree the remainder, and set aside some unprocessed ingredients to add at the end for a heartier texture. Serve at room temperature, or if it’s a super hot day, chill in the fridge for 1 hour or so.

our famous tomato soup

8 Jun

4423106049_dba2669827Many parents have been wondering how we make our tomato soup at lunch-time. It has always been one our most popular soups, and we are happy to share our recipe with you all. We serve it up with a popcorn garnish which our students have come to love. Try it at home and let us know how it turns out!

Ingredients:

  • 2 cans of crushed tomatoes
  • ~1 tomato can worth of water
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 celery stalk
  • 1 white or yellow onion
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic
  • salt to taste
  • spice sachet (1 cinnamon stick, 1 tablespoon oregano, ~10 whole peppercorns)
  • olive oil

Directions:

Dice onion, mince carrot and celery and finely chop garlic. Heat a pot with olive oil, add onion and sweat until translucent. Add tomatoes and a tomato can worth of water, bring to a simmer. Judge the consistency, you may have to add another half can or so. Make the sachet by folding spices in a square of cheesecloth and tie it off so it won’t come apart. Add the sachet to the soup and summer for 45 minutes. Remove the sachet and blend the mixture with an immersion blender until smooth. If you don’t have an immersion blender you can move the soup to a blender or food processor. Be careful, it’s hot! Add salt to taste, and serve with freshly popped popcorn, or on it’s own.

Photo courtesy of stevendepolo

our love affair with beans

2 May

8035456049_0801afba3fHere at Butter Beans, we truly love our beans!

You may have wondered where we came up with the name Butter Beans? Our co-founder and CEO, Belinda grew up in North Carolina on a farm and used to shell butter beans with her grandmother. This experience stood out to her as one of her fondest food memories. Butter beans are extremely nutrient dense and delicious, and were one of Belinda’s favorite foods she enjoyed as a child. Now these beans have come to embody our mission of feeding children nutritious foods at lunch-time, teaching children about nutrition, and the skills to cook up homemade meals for themselves and their families.

Beans are an excellent source of protein, are filled with fiber, vitamin B, folate and minerals like iron, potassium and zinc. Eating beans helps keep your heart, circulation, blood pressure and digestion strong! They make a great addition to most dishes; mixed into rice or quinoa, tossed into salads, blended into dips, sculpted into patties, stewed in soups, and spiced up to make a tasty chili.

Buying them in a can is great for saving time (always rinse the beans in a colander after opening the can to remove some of the sodium, and look for cans that are BPA free), however, buying them dry then soaking and cooking them on your own can save you money and time too (say thank you to your freezer)!  Soaking your beans also allows for easier digestion, and contain a lesser amount of sodium than canned beans.

Here’s how you can make your very own delicious beans at home:

Add 1 cup of dried beans to a bowl (they get bigger when you soak them, so with 1 cup of dried beans you end up with 2.5-3 cups depending on the bean), add water to cover the beans and place on your countertop or in your fridge for at least 8 hours. Rinse your beans off in a colander, and place in a pot. Add water to cover your beans by at least 2-3 inches, bring to a boil, then simmer for 45 minutes- 1 hour (they are pretty low maintenance). Like you would when cooking pasta, taste a few beans to make sure they are cooked to your desired texture.

Use your cooked beans for lunch, dinner or even breakfast (huevos rancheros, yum). With your leftover or extra beans, place them in freezer bags or glass containers and place in your freezer for later use.

Photo courtesy of tonrulkens

Flora’s seasonal recipe: welcome back asparagus!

30 Apr

2552865406_0f2739a78bI’d like to give a warm welcome to our long lost friend, asparagus. When spring arrives, I always look forward to the shoots and stalks that we get to enjoy during this transformative time of year. When you are in the practice of eating seasonally you tend to get really excited about welcoming back certain items into your kitchen, and boy am I excited for asparagus’ debut!

I love asparagus, not only for it’s nutty-sweet taste, but also for the nourishment I receive from them. Asparagus is full of vitamin K, B’s, C, beta-carotene, zinc and other trace minerals that helps clear our skin, and clean our blood. Thanks my friends!

When I have a bundle of asparagus waiting to be devoured, one of my first inclinations is to sauté them like we did last spring, but this spring I want to try something different, so I’m going to make a fresh asparagus soup for chillier spring evenings.

Here’s how:

Ingredients:

  • 1 Bunch of local asparagus
  • 4 cups of vegetable stock
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • Salt + pepper to taste

Directions:

Roast your garlic, by placing your cloves (keep the peel on) in the oven at 400F for 30 minutes. Add your stock and bring to a boil. Snap off the bottom of your asparagus stems (save them for a shaved salad later), and simmer them in the stock for 10-20 minutes or until your asparagus is fork tender. Place your tender spears and vegetable stock into your blender (or keep it in your pot, and use an immersion blender), add the roasted garlic (peels removed) and blend until smooth. Top your soup off with a drizzle of olive oil, and sprinkle with a touch of salt and pepper. I added a touch of goat cheese to mimic the effect of creme fraiche, but the soup stands well on it’s own without the addition of cheese.

Happy spring eating to all!

Photo courtesy of Benson Kua