Tag Archives: summer campers

cooking energy

26 Jun

6835168360_2805c66ff0“Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all.” -Harriet van Horne

Try this experiment:

1. Cook a meal after an argument you had, a broken tire, commuting delays, or after a general bad day.

2. Cook a meal after you just finished a project you are proud of, just came back from an inspiring exercise session, snuggled with your kids, husband/wife, pets, took a leisurely stroll, or after a general good day.

In each case, what do you think your food will taste like?

The energy that we put into making our meals is incredibly important. When we are in a negative state of mind, the end result of our meal won’t taste very vibrant. When we are in a positive state of mind, our food will sing with good energy, taste, texture and overall appeal.

We teach this fundamental concept to our cooking class students and summer campers. Learning how our energy affects our food (and countless other aspects of our lives) at a young age will help solidify good cooking habits for the future.

The next time you cook, think about what mood you are in. If you are in a bad mood, try simply smiling while sautéing, prepping, assembling – maybe put on some music. Even these little steps can cause a major shift in your energy.

Your taste buds will thank you!

Photo courtesy of Summer Skyes 11

what’s at the farmers market?

30 Jul

At the Union Square Farmer’s Market this morning, our food & garden summer campers picked out a handful of ripe tomatoes.

When we came back to home base, we discussed how we wanted to transform them into something delectable.

Some of the ideas they had were to eat them raw, and add some basil and olive oil, some of them wanted to roast them with salt and pepper, others wanted to sauté them to make a fresh tomato sauce.

We took a vote and the consensus was, fresh tomato sauce!

The tomatoes sautéed with the companionship of some fresh zucchini, garlic, basil and onion. After taking turns sautéing, we added the sauce to our freshly cooked pasta, and mixed it all up. We then topped it off with fresh parmesan, and sang our song to thank the farmers and the soil for our meal.

And then we dug in!

how does your garden grow?

27 Jul

What image pops into your head when you hear the word garden?

After touring the various rooftop farms and gardens in NYC with our summer campers, we have learned that there are many alternatives to the conventional image of a garden. We are constantly in awe of the creative ways people garden and farm these days. With the advent of phones you can talk to, and cars that park themselves, these unconventional methods of growing food seem to be in line with our evolution and advancement.

Here are some creative growing ideas that we have come across lately:

  • Rooftop farms are sprouting all over our great city, and are inspiring lots of momentum in many other cities. Look out for a rooftop farm near you! This recent New York Times article provides a great overview of the projects going on at this very moment.
  • Hanging gardens are convenient for those who don’t have access to a plot of land. The photo we have highlight in our post is from our co-founder’s backyard! She is growing a plethora of vegetables for her whole family to enjoy.
  • Windowsill gardens are another fantastic way to grow vegetables. Use your windowsill to your benefit, and get planting! Check out this resource for windowsill gardening guidance.
  • Soda bottle gardens, a creative way to recycle your bottles! Take a look at this inspiring vertical wall garden concept from landscape designers in Brazil.
  • Woolly pocket gardens, a favorite in schools and backyards. You can plant all sorts of veggies and herbs in these fun pockets.
  • Wine box gardens, fantastic way to recycle wine boxes. Just go into your favorite wine shop and ask the owner if they have any extras leftover. You may be in luck!
  • Old pallet gardens, super unusual, yet functional way to grow vegetables in a small space. Vertical is the new horizontal in small spaces.

The possibilities are indeed endless!